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Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle. Please leave any comments there.

Flower photos, because they make me happy. I had a lot more time in the garden this year — the little guy is a more independent now and can be trusted to frolic outside on a longer leash than in previous years. Not enough time to start an actual vegetable patch like I’d planned (it...

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Last spring I planted two little anemones in a little leftover triangle of soil with the vague hope that they might actually survive and make an otherwise unremarkable corner remarkable. While the one on the left seems to have either succumbed to bad weather or weed competition, this...

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These are actually pictures of last year’s birthday bouquet, but I didn’t put them up yet so they’re still fair game. It makes me feel better, paging through pictures of bouquets (and their attached memories) during the times ...

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Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle. Please leave any comments there.


I’ve seen how-to posts for doing flower ice cubes before, but not too many for doing larger blocks. Probably because the only places these remain viable for any length of time is in the frozen north. Lots of talk of wedding centerpieces and luminaries, mostly. However, on a trip to the ...

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The Field Mouse-ear (Cerastium arvense) is an unassuming little flower that I only noticed this year after starting this series of blog posts. Turns out, it’s a chickweed and considered edible (boiled, tastes of spinach, like the rest of the chickweeds) if slightly on the hairy side...

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Remember how I was bemoaning my inability to grow sweet peas and how I had to be content with its cousins like tufted vetch? Well, a little after those bloomed, these came on the scene! Meadow vetchling (Lathyrus pratensis) could be called a sibling of the garden sweet pea, being from the same ...

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Hybrid Rugosa Rose ‘F.J. Grootendorst‘ seems like a huge mouthful of name for such a smallish flower, but there you go. I think this is the first year this shrub rose has even put on a decent display. Like many other plants in the garden, it seems to have benefited from the mild...

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Dotted Loosestrife (Lysimachia punctata) is another plant from our inherited perennial collection. It is completely unrelated to Purple Loosestrife, which I previously posted about, yet given the same colloquial name because both plants are used for similar purposes as traditional medicinal...

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Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is native to Finland, considered harmless and ornamental. Oddly enough, it is labeled an invasive species in the States, much in the same way that lupines are here. Regardless of weed status, we have these in our perennial border and I think the purple s...

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Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle. Please leave any comments there.


 
Maltese Cross (Lychnis chalcedonica) is another one of the cottage garden perennials that came with our property. Every year it sets out the brightest red bunches of flowers out of any plant in the garden. They contrast beautifully with the blue iris they are planted next to and are...

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Not always, but the ones I planted this year are. The house I grew up in had lots of rose bushes. We could have cut flowers for most of the year because they didn’t really go dormant or need to be cut down for winter. They would just keep getting bigger and bigger — I remember ...

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One of my favorite flowers, common garden foxglove (Digitalis purpurea), is native to most of temperate Europe and a classic cottage garden plant, so I was rather surprised to not find it already established when we moved in. I set myself to fixing that oversight as soon as I could. It took a...

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I thought the peony and lilac bouquets from last month were fragrant, but this burnet rose and honeysuckle combination from earlier in the month nearly blew our noses off. Felt like walking into a florists’ fridge when we came in the front door Pity that the flowering...

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The Rugosa Rose (Rosa rugosa) is another one of those somewhat invasive species that you can’t help but still be fond of. It helps that there are only a couple of these in our yard, which were planted intentionally. They are low maintenance, with lots of glossy foliage and large, bright...

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A good friend and fellow plant enthusiast took us orchid hunting yesterday in some nearby woods. There are a few species that grow wild in our area and she knew how much I love wildflowers — the notion of seeing an orchid in situ was very exciting! Southern Finland doesn’t have as ma...

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For the past five years, I have been trying to grow sweet peas with only the slightest success. For some reason, they just really hate me. So when I noticed some sweet pea-like growth under one of the containers that I had previously planted with the seeds, I dared to hope that they might have...

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Oxeye Daisy

Jul. 5th, 2015 05:00 am
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Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle. Please leave any comments there.


Oxeye Daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare) is a common wildflower here in Finland, popping up in fields and gardens at random. Like many other wildflowers, Finns will walk on them or whack them down nonchalantly while tidying their gardens without a second thought. When I was ...

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Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle. Please leave any comments there.


Our midsummer roses are finally opening! A little late this year, but it’s been a very long and cool spring. That same spring gave our large plant plenty of time to grow buds and it is currently giving us a showstopping display now that the weather is warming. There...

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Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle. Please leave any comments there.

I just finished up a 7 day photography challenge over on Facebook — the husband tagged me to do 7 nature pictures and I ended up narrowing it down further for myself by deciding to do only flowers in the blue-purple spectrum that arrived on our property without my aid. I had so much fun...

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Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle. Please leave any comments there.


Even though this year’s midsummer was mostly spent inside due to it raining all day, I had a chance to nip out in the morning and snap some pictures for my mid-season garden tour. This was the year that I was FINALLY able to get some major work done in my vegetable ...

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