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Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

A link for Hausen, who likes comics:

Flintlocke’s Guide to Azeroth

Long, silly, and makes the character in Twilight Highlands make a LOT more sense :-)

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pierydys: (pic#507823)

A link for Hausen, who likes comics:

Flintlocke’s Guide to Azeroth

Long, silly, and makes the character in Twilight Highlands make a LOT more sense :-)

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Mirrored from My Cat Eats Faces.

pierydys: (roar)

Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

The boy pointed me to this page after having to listen to my repeated whining over the chore of disenchanting his multiple pages of craftycrap every few days. Because really, there’s nothing more tedious than toiling over a hot mailbox for upwards of half an hour, waving your hands repeatedly like some spastic jazz dancer for all to see. And not even getting to keep the spoils! It’s a good thing I like him. (And that he bought my epic flight training, but that’s another thing entirely…)

Anyway, this page here from elitist-jerks has some cool macros near the bottom to make DEing just a bit easier. They’re specialized right now for jewelcrafting, but one can change out the names to make them suitable for any item that they frequently turn to dust. It’s a bit more specific than the macro I’d been mulling over in my head for a while (which would have targeted specific bag slots instead), but is also probably safer for those that keep valuable disenchantable raid gear in their bags alongside their craftycrap.

Whatever shall I do with all the free time this has saved me? ;-P

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Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

Well, you all know I use a lot of addons. Occasionally, I have to download things WoW-related besides addons, though. These end up usually being related to addons, however. I’ve been using two non-addon programs lately, and promised I’d put up links for a few people. So here we go!

Curse Client, to replace the hole left by WoWMatrix for those of you that have far too many addons to update them all manually on a regular basis. I have mixed feelings about the official Curse Client — I tried it out a long time ago and quickly ditched it for WM because of a few things which continue to be annoying. More so, even, now that I’m forced to put up with them. First, it’s slowish and only offers the faster service to those who pay. WM might have had tacky looking banners, but they didn’t ask for money that brazenly. Second, you are not allowed to use the “Update All” feature unless you have the “premium” version, so have to go through and still click “update” individually on all the addons that are highlighted as needing updates. Third, it only updates those addons that are hosted on Curse. Which is a majority of them, but there’s still at least ten that I have to go and do manually because they’re hosted either on WoWInterface or their own specific sites. These are fairly big-name addons, too. So to wrap it up… eh. The current version of Curse Client is kinda like, say, a hospital dressing gown. It covers you, to a point, but it’s kinda flimsy and you can’t help feeling a draft trying to get at your butt. It’s not necessary, but who wants to go naked, right? WoWMatrix was, perhaps, a cheap polyester bathrobe from the gym. Not fancy, kinda tacky, but very good at doing what it did in an efficient manner, despite its shortfalls. Now, if somebody would make the plush chenille spa robe version of an addon installer…

Rawr is something that I tried out late last week because I was working on maxing my boomkin’s DPS. There weren’t really any DPS spreadsheets available for balance druids, so I wandered further afield and ended up finding this little gem of a program. It’s basically a fancy spreadsheet with a huge attached database. It can download your info straight from armory and do all the calculations and tweaks you want, with bonus pictures and shiny visuals! You can also tell it to optimize your gear or scan for upgrades, and it’ll give you all that info in nice, neat XML files for later usage. Just a fun little tool to play with, for those of you that like planning and running simulations on your character with the hypothetical gear your wishful heart desires. This program does not annoy me. In fact, it even heals some of the hurt that Curse Client inflicts whenever I have to use it. Bless you, Rawr.

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Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

As with all these “beginning a such and such” articles, I suggest going with the template, then tweaking things to fit your own preferences and personality after giving it a test run to familiarize yourself with the build’s options. Be aware of how each talent affects your overall performance, instead of taking something just because “it sounds good” — a bit of research and/or number crunching can mean a difference of hundreds of DPS!

Of the three trees, marksman is definitely getting the least specialization these days. This holds especially true in PvE and raiding, where MM is seen as the “PvP spec”. This is because it tends toward burst damage (hit them fast, hit them hard) at the cost of sustained DPS (firing at a boss for 10 minutes straight). It’s possible for raiders to work around the mana and aggro issues with careful cooldown management, though, and the spec brings along its own utility. MM hunters are highly mobile thanks to their arsenal of stings and Readiness, a quality that comes in very useful during fights heavy on choreography. The main reason I like to bring a MM in our raids is their very valuable raid-wide buff, Trueshot Aura (it stacks with Might/Battle Shout and is analogous to Abomination’s Might/Unleashed Fury). Most other builds use the MM tree to complement their specs for a reason, so let’s take a look at a good raiding spec for MM. (The following is taken almost directly from Wowwiki.)

11/53/7 MM PvE Raiding Build

Itemize for agility > attack power > crit to get the most out of those talents.

Suggested Glyphs
* Major Glyph of Steady Shot
* Major Glyph of Improved Aspect of the Hawk
* Major Glyph of Hunter’s Mark
* Minor Glyph of Revive Pet
* Minor Glyph of Mend Pet
* Minor Glyph of Feign Death

Alternatives
* Major Glyph of Trueshot Aura
* Major Glyph of Arcane Shot
* Major Glyph of Aimed Shot

The suggested shot rotation is Steady Shot with Chimera Shot at every cooldown (usually a 3:1 ratio). Weave Arcane, Multi and Aimed as available, and be sure to use Kill Command on those pets. Also remember to Misdirect to the tank and drop aggro whenever a cooldown is up, to keep aggro under control. There are macros available for some of this, but I’d suggest getting used to the rhythm of handling a MM rotation before anything of that sort, especially since there can be quite a bit of variability due to the amount of movement involved in a fight.

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Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

So back during the Great BM Nerf of 3.0.8, there were only three raiding hunters in the guild and two of us went Survival. After BM was unnerfed in the following patch, we stayed that way because it added some nice variety to the raid pool (we now have 2 BM, 2 MM and 2 SV, if my last count was accurate) so everybody could get a solid set of buffs. Well, that and at least I was too cheap to fork out another 50g for respeccing (and another few hundred on matching gems, enchants, and glyphs) when I knew I’d be throwing 1K at a trainer pretty soon to get dual specs anyway.

With dual specs looming ever closer, I suppose it’s time for all of us to sit down and figure out what our talents are going to look like. My hunter, I know, will have a spec for BM raiding (aka The Return of Wilhelm the Devilsaur) and a spec for Survival raiding (aka Halp! We Needs Replenishment!). Of course, there will be talent changes when 3.1 goes live, so anything said about talent speccing now is just what’s working in the live realms with only an occasional passing nod to what might happen with the new patch.

All that being said, let’s look at what a good Survival build should include. I based my hunter’s SV build off of Lienna’s recommendations and would encourage those new to SV to give her template a whirl. She goes step by step, provides nice pictures, explains everything very well and has been playing the tree since far before there was ever a hint of SV being as popular as it’s become. She knows what she’s talking about.

Survival Talents For PVE
Those Other Talents That are Not Survival but Help Survival

Like any other build, start with the template then start tweaking depending on your needs and preferences. There’s no such thing as a perfect build, although number crunchers can serve up countless “optimal DPS” variations. The player puts those talents into effect. A talent you specced for but don’t use because you don’t like it is wasted.

For a full discussion on all aspects of making your survival hunter, I refer you to:

The Elist Jerk’s Survival Hunter in WotLK Thread

Because there’s no use repeating what’s been put so well. It goes into detail about talents, glyphs, itemization, shot rotations, pets, and much, much more. A good read on a Tuesday morning ;-)

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Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

So after looking more at the screenies I put up, I realized that in last night’s excitement, I didn’t really show what I meant by “more screen estate”. What I meant was that in the first of the three, there were bars every which way I looked, whether or not I was in combat. There will be stuff that pops up with combat, of course, that’s a good thing. And there will be more stuff popping up in raids, because there’s more information to keep track of. The second screenie illustrated that well enough, with the raid unit frames and warning windows. But what it failed to show was that when I’m just wandering around town or doing light questing, this is what I’m really seeing:

As you can see, there is now a wide expanse of clear space across my entire screen. Even the chat is fairly see-through, and the mini-map has everything available through mouseover to keep things clean.

Oh, and a few more things I added last night:

Talented
A little application that lets you save alternate templates and play with your talent build on one big panel in-game. I saved my druid’s two alternate healing specs and my hunter’s BM build, so that respeccing will go MUCH faster and with less clicking mistakes. It can also export builds to the ‘net so you can link them to people. With dual specs coming up, I want to have play around more with speccing options before I decide which ones to go with, and then be able to pop it in there whole when I figure it out.

RatingBuster
A little tooltip that converts ratings to actual numbers (so you know how much attack power you’ll get for that amount of agility, etc) and compares it with what you’re currently wearing. By the middle of endgame, it can get really hard to tell what’s an upgrade and what isn’t, so this helps calculate those numbers to give you a faster idea of whether or not you truly want to roll for that loot.

Range Display
And finally, as a survival hunter, range is a huge issue since you need it to maximize your DPS. There was a range finder in XPerl, but I found it a bit lacking in the specifics that we needed. This thing does nothing but pop up your range in yards, and that’s exactly what we need.

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Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

As promised earlier, I have finished fiddling around with my UI this afternoon and took it for a test run through Naxx 25 tonight. It’s going to take a bit getting used to, because I moved around a lot of things and there are new functionalities, but on the whole I’m very pleased with it. It streamlines a lot of the things that bugged me about my old UI, and makes the whole thing look more aesthetic and unified. After comparing the two screenshots, I’m convinced that I’ve kept the same amount of screen estate if not gained slightly more.

What’s Been Replaced:

Chatter
I changed to Chatter from Prat because it was much easier to configure and set up, and had some nifty features that I could never figure out how to enable on Prat. So now I can cut and paste directly from the chat window’s text, note the name of a person’s alt as it’s actually scrolling by, and speak to whatever group I’m in with /gr instead of trying to figure out whether they are /r, /p, or /g, amongst others. It’s also much easier to resize and move around, which is important when I’ve got huge raid charts that start covering up what people are saying. Additionally, Prat came in three folders (one of which was even labeled as “high CPU usage”) as opposed to Chatter’s slim one folder, and that usually indicates a more smoothly-running program.

X-Perl Unitframes
X-Perl is something I’ve been meaning to fiddle with for a very long time, but was always intimidated by because of the crazy amount of options. Turns out they’re not that hard when you go through them one panel at a time, and all those options are so worth looking through. That sleek character display box, and the neat chart of the raid? Packs so much more information in so much less space than making a raid chart with by hand standard Blizz tools could. What’s harder to see in a still picture is that those little portraits can also be made into animated 3D versions, which looks amazing on a computer that can handle a little more rendering. Pretty parts aside, it does useful things like make your key debuffs on a target big, with a timer smacked right on the icon so you know exactly when to reapply that debuff. It also comes with a little panel which will keep track of what the tanks’ targets are, effectively replacing my out-of-date MainAssist.

Dominos
Lastly, I replaced Bartender with Dominos, the other very popular bar mod. I did this mostly because I was curious to see if there was much of a difference and can honestly say that the only thing Dominos has in its favor is that it installs easier. It imports previous bar configurations over much more smoothly than Bartender did, the first time I opened it. The boy’s sister’s cat is named Domino, though, so that might have also been where some of the appeal came from ;-)

The Completely New:

Sunn Viewport Art
As I mentioned earlier, a big reason I wanted to change things was because I was starting to feel boxed in by the rows and columns of buttons on every side of the screen. I wanted to put all those buttons in one area and make some viewing space to spread out. Sunn Viewport does a nice job of this, by creating a specific interface area at the bottom of the page while not affecting the proportions of the remaining screen. Plus, that area below now matches the Titan Panel bar on the top, lending the whole thing a unified control panel look. The blank spaces between all my former bars were really starting to get on my nerves.

QBar
At first, I downloaded this one mostly for the boy because he was always whining about not being able to find his quest items. Which served him right, because he’s a horrible bag organizer. But once I saw how automatic and handy it was, I had to have it, too. Rather than digging around for an item and sticking it on one of your premium button slots just for the length of whatever quest you’re doing, you can now have them all plopped together in their own movable bar. Individual items can be clicked on or off, if there’s anything you’re not going to use anytime soon, and it will neatly categorize any quest item that might be in your bags so you can reach for it fast.

AutoBar
In the same category as QBar is AutoBar, which gives you one small bar with buttons that slide open to give you clickable options for everything in that category. For example, one button is for food and scrolling over it will slide out a bar which lists all the foods you have in your bags to choose from without having to dig through several different bags to find it. It also has class-specific bars which do the same thing, which is especially useful for stuff like aspects and pet commands, many of simply don’t need to be displayed all the time. A great way to conserve space and keep everything neat-looking while still making everything quickly accessible.

Button Facade
The last of the bar mods is this simple little doodad, whose sole purpose is to put pretty skins on buttons. A handy way to make everything match, if you should so desire. I haven’t tried to do anything too artistic with it yet, but one of these days, I might be inspired.

Gatherer Addon
I know, I know — how could I NOT have this already? Yeesh. To be fair, I didn’t have any high-level gatherers before my death knight came along — both my druid and hunter have two crafting professions to make them more useful for raiding. Since this is no longer the case with self-buffing professions and a couple of gatherer alts, it was finally time to download this baby. And yes, it’s as useful as everybody says. Keep track of where you’re going, where you’ve been, and how much farming you can get done in between with this handy-dandy map-friendly tracker.

Livestock
Because what would farming be without livestock? Or maybe not. This was definitely one of those things I downloaded purely for fun and to indulge my own pet obsession. Livestock gives you buttons that let you summon random pets and mounts, can be configured to always have a pet out when you log in, and has a cool “smart mount” feature which lets you click one button to be in whatever form of travel is most convenient. This is especially cool on my druid because it does perfectly what repeated conditional shapeshifting macros have always managed to get buggy on. If you like pets or want to have something automatically get you places fast, think about this one.

Decursive
This one’s mostly for my healers and casters — it pops up a nice color-coded grid that displays the various debuffs people are getting and allows you to fix them up with the click of a button. Really great for when you’re on poison cleansing duty.

Friend/Ignore Share
Something I should have gotten ages ago — this addon imports friendslists across alts, making it much easier to keep track of everybody you know when you’re logging between different characters. Of course, the maximum number possible on any one toon is the Blizz imposed 50, so you’re still screwed if you’re really popular, but this still makes life much easier than having to bounce back and forth to talk to add one person to all your lists.

OverAchiever
I like achievements, don’t y
ou? This adds a couple of tabs to the Achievements window, including a search option and a recommendations list if you’re wondering what you should be going for next. It also has a tooltip feature, so that if you encounter something which can go towards an achievement, it’ll alert you to it when you mouse over it.

AchievementSnap
This one is mostly for the guild, because I sometimes forget to snap pictures of us in raids when we do our guild firsts. This takes a screenie for me at every momentous occasion, so I’ll be sure to have a picture documenting our escapades as they happen.

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Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

It’s been half a year since my last UI Post and many things have changed since then. A new expansion has come out. Old addons have died, many more have proliferated. My computer was fixed and has an actual working graphics card! I’ve been mentioning some of the addons I use in guild chat, but figured it was probably time for a more comprehensive link list. Below is my hunter’s current UI setup. During my weekly round of updates this morning, I also picked up a new stack of toys I’m going to be testing out on my druid before implementing on my main. So this post is sort of bookmark for where I was last at before the newest round of stuff got plugged in.

Altoholic
An old favorite, happily updated to show tons more information with the new expansion. It now even has the ability to sync with other players, so you can get information about their alts as well. I’m betting this will be a hit with multi-boxers, but would be useful for just about anybody that groups together on a constant basis, like me and the boy. When synced, he doesn’t have to keep poking me about logging over to an alt to link my enchanting list for him, he can go look at it his darn self. The interface is available through the frothy beer icon on the minimap, and can also be displayed on Titan Panel.

AtlasLoot Advanced
A very complete and searchable loot database, so you can look up exactly what’s going to drop from whatever encounter you’re currently facing. It’ll also tell you what’s available from various reputation vendors, factions, and professions, so you don’t sound a noob asking for links on trade chat every five minutes. Good to have if you like to plan out what sort of loot you’d like and where to get it. Not good to get if you’re a person that likes to spam guild chat with links to stuff you wish you had but obviously don’t. Please use with discretion.

Auctioneer Suite
The first addon I ever downloaded and a staple ever since. It does use a lot of resources, so some people only turn it on for their banker alts, where the majority of its features are most useful. If you’re not using Auctioneer, you’re probably not making as much at the auction house as you should be. It’s also really useful to have while questing because it will give you a tooltip for every drop or reward, telling you whether to vendor, disenchant or auction along with the actual prices for each. I currently have it turned on full for all my toons because of this feature. The control panel is available through an unobtrusive sliding side tab that can be repositioned anywhere on the edges of the screen. Mine is on the bottom left under the chat box and virtually invisible.

Bartender 4
My former bar mod died with the new expansion, leading me to download Bartender. Now that I’ve become spoiled with being able to move around and add any bar I want, I don’t know how I ever lived with the vanilla Blizzard bars. A raider has to have so many items and spells ready at all times that shuffling repeatedly through the default bars at each pull would easily lead to repeated face-keyboard interaction instead. Happily, Bartender lets me add separate pet bars, aspect bars, trap bars, and rep bars — all movable to any place on the screen I’d prefer. Very handy. [There are a few different options, all widely-used -- I'm currently testing out a competing bar mod on my druid to see how it compares to Bartender.] Anybody that has several bars full of spells and is tearing their hair out rotating through them should definitely take a look at some sort of bar mod.

Cartographer 3
New and improved! Well, some would argue over the “improved” part. It’s definitely different from the old version, and has many more bells and whistles. At its base, though, it is still a useful map addon that gives you more information and freedom to play with the map than the default Blizzard version. It also readily plugs together with my LightHeaded and TomTom addons, as well as most map-related programs. I find Cart3 especially useful in tracking guild members and friends across the entire map, and when making notes about certain areas so I can reference them later with other characters.

Deadly Boss Mods 4
Was there ever a time when people raided without DBM? Must’ve been back when they played with sticks and mud. DBM is one of the three necessary downloads required for raiding by our guild. It alerts the raider to key elements in any boss fight they could possibly be entering, so that raid leaders don’t have to be constantly shouting in your ear. It keeps you from being less dead, period. The config button lives on the mini-map, but most people just install, click all the options on, and never have to worry about it again. It automagically pops up during boss encounters and saves your butt. What more could you want?

LightHeaded
LightHeaded is my questing addon. Lots of people, including the boy, use Questhelper, but I tend to find that one a little too overbearing in its presentation. LightHeaded is nothing more than an attachment on the side of your quest window which links to the WowHead quest descriptions, complete with links and comments. It’s the comments section which really make this a winner, though. While Questhelper will point out coordinates and tell you roughly what to do, LH comments are posted by people who’ve done the quests and usually offer insight, hints, and bug alerts above and beyond what anything automated can do. Almost all quests will list coordinates, but LH comments will often tell you the best ways to approach killing this, or where the best drop rate for that is, or why it’s easier to attack an elite in this particular manner. There have been countless times when the boy (using QH, mind you) has stopped to ask how they hell I did that quest, only to be told that I just read the LH tips and finished it in under a minute. I also believe LH uses less system resources than QH, which might make a difference to people on some computers. [One last note -- I use LH in conjunction with TomTom, so that I can just click on the quest coordinates links and have all those points automatically plotted to my map. Then I can choose which point to have my direction arrow point to, and plot my path through multiple quests to get it all done most efficiently. It's more hands-on/micro-managey than QH, which does all this for you automatically, but the slightly OCD control freak in me enjoys that aspect.]

MainAssist
This is sadly not updated anymore and I am currently testing a replacement for it. However, the current coding is so simple that it works despite being out-of-date. All it does is pop up a little box which tells you who the tanks are targeting. You input your tanks, and that’s that. It’s a fast and accurate targeting system that keeps trigger-happy DPS from killing the wrong thing at a critical moment in the raid ;-)

MikScrollingBattleText
Before I respecced to Survival, I was perfectly fine using Blizzard’s standard scrolling battle text. It was simple and gave the information I needed. With the intr
oduction of the Lock and Load proc, however, I needed more than it could offer. So I ended up downloading MSBT. There’s a link to how to configure it for various procs and events in one of my previous posts. It’s useful, comes in big bright fonts that you can make opaque or transparent, and you can program fun sounds in as well if you like that sort of thing. You can also specify where the text is placed, which is a nice thing for control freaks.

Omen
Another one of the three necessary downloads required for raiding by many guilds, including our own. Mine is currently living to the bottom right side of the screen, above the damage meter. While the built-in Blizz threat meter is handy, it isn’t nearly as detailed and doesn’t show multiple party members to help gauge your threat levels. In multi-tank encounters, this can get especially problematic. Tanks need Omen to know who’s creeping up on their threat levels. DPS need Omen to know when to drop their threat so they don’t get blacklisted by tanks. Healers need Omen to know who’s about to get smacked, so they can slap those people with a preliminary HoT. The only time anybody wouldn’t use Omen is if they were dead. We try not to have repeatedly dead people in raids, even though it makes cheap death knights happy. Logical enough.

Outfitter
Apparently, Blizzard will be coming out with its own version of this sort in the next big patch. Which I might or might not use, depending on what we learn about its functionality. Outfitter lets you create and organize as many different outfits as your heart desires, and will change you into them at the click of a button. I currently have a outfits set up for Raid Boss, Frost Resist, Arcane Resist, Max Stamina and Imminent Death. It can also be programmed to automatically change your accessories for specific occasions — mine equips a fishing pole when fishing, rocket boots when on Aspect of the Cheetah, and changes me into my Parachute Cloak when I’m falling. It can even help you choose sets, by calculating stats on all the pieces you have on your bag and maximizing whatever stats you tell it to. It’s handy on my hunter and indispensable on my druid, who carries multiple sets for each talent spec. The interface is attached to the right of the character window and has lots of little clicky boxes which recognize what you’re dragging into each slot.

PetEmote
A purely hunter addon. Well, I suppose warlocks and death knights might use it too, but I don’t think they have the sort of attachment to their pets that hunters develop. This little doohickey lets you automate pet gestures, and just generally gives you furry/feathery/scaled friend a bit more life. Set on automatic, your pet will randomly emote from a highly amusing list of preset options specific to their family. You can also use it to type in your own emotes, as directed through your pet. I’ve used this many times to have Kiisa cough up hairballs at particular raiders. Priceless.

Prat 3
My current chat program. I’m testing another one on my druid currently, but this has served me well for months now. Ever get annoyed that you can’t cut and paste text or web links from chat? This fixes it. Ever want to know what class and level the person speaking is? Yep, does that too. Most importantly, ever want to size your chat box bigger because you’re really, really nearsighted? Bingo, that’s totally me. Big text = happy eyes, yay.

Quartz
Handy old Quartz, still around after all this time. See that little timing thing with the cooldowns, right under my toon? That’s all Quartz does, but it does it WELL. Those that value maximizing DPS and cooldowns through timing shot rotations (which should be most hunters, hint hint) should consider this addon or something like it.

Recount
My love-hate relationship with damage meters continues. I still don’t think that it is healthy for people to be worrying so much over their DPS on every pull that they’re fighting to top each other at the expense of teamwork. This can easily happen when damage meters fall into the hands of over-competitive, egotistical, usually-male gamer children. This behavior is not needed in a raid. Furthermore, damage reports can vary between various individuals depending on their spacing during a particular fight. Range and melee reports can often vary widely, so people aren’t even making their assumptions on correct numbers. However, used effectively — such as at the end of a raid or after a wipe — Recount is an effective diagnostic tool that can help pinpoint where individuals can improve their performance. My personal vote would be to leave damage meters to the officers and raid leaders, and just ask them how you did afterwards if you feel it’s necessary. Or, use it responsibly and sparingly. It saves system resources, keeps lengthy reports from being indiscriminately spammed on various chats, and saves many people’s sanity. I keep my Recount box tucked in the bottom right hand corner, and often don’t even notice it until the end of a raid. Just the way it should be.

SexyMap
I picked up this little thing when it first debuted, and it has only gotten shinier since. It’s what’s making my map in the upper corner there a different shape — I use a very plain skin because my computer used to not be able to handle the prettier animated skins. You’ll see lots of people using the pretty glowy blue one, though. It also fades the minimap buttons out until you mouse over them, if you want (I could care less) a clean-looking map. It doesn’t just pimp your map, though — the main reason I keep it is because it allows me to move around quest progress boxes and timers, which would otherwise hidden under some of my Bartender bars on the Blizz default setup. Just another one of those optional doodads that gives you more control over screen space, with some very shiny eye candy thrown in.

Suicide Kings
Our guild is currently using the loot ladder system of loot distribution, and Suicide Kings provides the framework to arrange those raider lists. There’s more information about the system at the Suicide Kings forums. There is just one master list for the entire guild, run by whomever is the master looter. Once the master is specified, he or she can sync the lists of any other raiders who are running the addon. Many guildies will probably want to download it just so they can see the updated lists and track their positions for loot distribution.

Titan Outfitter
Just a tiny plug-in to Titan Panel so that it shows Outfitter on the main panel.

Titan Panel
That’d be the information bar running across the top of the screen. Another one of those addons that I’ve seen on countless screencaps and finally got around to implementing on my own. Terribly useful — I have no idea why I didn’t try it out sooner. All the information you could possibly need, right at the top of the screen. The Repair and Ammo indicators are especially useful on my hunter, and probably good for any raider. I often suspect the raiders who show up unprepared and have to go back and repair after the first boss are people without Titan Panel. I also have the clock set to show local time, which nice to have around in addition to the built-in clock on the mini-map which shows server time.
There are lots of little plug-ins available that will connect other addons to the Panel and make them more easily accessible.

TomTom
My friends always used to joke that I needed a GPS when I’d wind up in completely the wrong wing of a particular dungeon. So I finally got one. This handy little arrow points me wherever I want it to on the map, and works especially well in conjunction with LightHeaded to get me where I want in the most convenient manner.

As always, I am very curious about what everybody else is doing with their own user interfaces, since handy new addons pop up all the time. Another post in the near future, as testing continues on the druid’s set of newly downloaded toys from this morning.

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pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

I’m not gonna bother making a guide, because plenty of people have made very fine ones for us already.

If you are using Scrolling Combat Text, please check out Lienna’s guide.

If you are using Mik’s Scrolling Battle Text, please check out the Warcraft Hunters Union guide.

If you haven’t decided which one you’re going to use yet, I’d suggest trying the second one (Mik’s) because it’s been updated most recently and is just one big addon, as opposed to several smaller ones linked together. At least, that’s the reason I use that one. Lots of people like SCT, though, and I believe it’s been around longer.

Once you’ve done this walk-through for L&L, it’ll be easy enough to plug in other events or spells that you want similar warnings for.

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Originally published at My Cat Eats Faces. Please leave any comments there.

Gem Guide
http://www.wowwiki.com/Gem

Instance Guide
http://www.wowwiki.com/Instance

Heroic Instance Guide
http://www.wowwiki.com/Heroic

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