pierydys: (Default)
Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle. Please leave any comments there.

It has been three years since I posted my last craft update, much to my dismay. Disappointing especially since I had all these plans for doing baby stuff, only to have time run out on me. There is light at the end of the tunnel, however, with the little person finally letting me get more things...

Continue reading

pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

One hour project for a weekday morning! And really, most of that work time was just devoted to ironing the thing out and measuring it. I decided I needed more skirts, so that’s what this second elephant sarong became. As simple as cutting it in half length-wise and adding elastic to the waist. Well, the bottom hemming did get a bit tricky. One half of the skirt used the natural hem, but I had to fiddle with the other half because it was cut in mid-pattern and thus the hem looked messy and incomplete. So I covered it up with a strip of simpler pattern, which gave it a more finished look and also added some weight to the bottom of the skirt. It is very light cotton so wearing it anywhere windy might be asking for trouble!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

A couple years ago, I threw together a couple items in my closet to make a purple sarong minidress. It was promptly borrowed by a purple-loving friend and has since gotten misplaced somewhere during the big move. Besides being fun and colorful, it was also a very comfortable and easy-to-wear sundress. The tank top had a built-in bra and the skirt was silky soft from years of washing, so you could really just throw it on and be out the door in seconds. I finally dug up my fabric stash and was delighted to find a handful of sarongs at the bottom of the box. The first thing I set about doing was creating another mixed media dress to lounge in as these ever-lengthening summer days come upon us.

I made a few adjustments from my last dress. The skirt now sits at the natural waist, rather than the lowered empire waist of the previous version. this makes it slightly lower than mid-thigh on me and perfectly acceptable as a dress rather than a tunic. Instead of letting the skirt bunch in random gathers like the previous dress, I spaced out a series of loose inverted pleats to give the dress a more even fullness. The bow at the back is now adjustable and can be untied, unlike the decorative bow in the former version. Pardon the bunching at the back — the dress is one size larger than the form and it’s a pain to change sizes just for a quick snapshot. It fits perfectly fine on me, which is the main point :-)

My materials, before the conversion. Now, to work on the other two sarongs…

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

I just finished making this. It is my first sweater. It is also the first full thing I’ve ever knit. I’m rather happy with the result. It actually looks more boobtastic on me because I tend to wear my belts a bit higher (short torso and all) and have a bit more curve than this form does.

So my recent crafting timeline looks something like this.

Two months ago, I visited my buddies in Turku. We visited a local yarn store and talked a lot about yarn, crochet, sheep, and general winter craft stuff. I returned home with a deep need to Make Things again. I immediately dug out my yarn stash and crochet hooks, which hadn’t seen the light in nearly a decade, and started churning out small project after project until my hands felt like they were ready to fall off. I also started using my Ravelry account for the first time in months, and ended up with a to-do queue that would probably clothe a small island nation.

A month and a week ago, I went to visit my very first Finnish friend and expressed regrets over never really learning to knit. She, figuring there was no time like the present, whipped out some needles and a ball of yarn and patiently demonstrated Continental knitting for me right there and then. I think she might have had to correct every other stitch I made in those first few agonizingly slow and clumsy minutes, but I finally saw where everything was supposed to go. Something actually clicked and made sense this time around, probably because I’d been scrutinizing stitch structures so closely for the past month. Later that week, I went out and bought my first pair of straight knitting needles. This was quickly followed by a pair of circulars.

After doing a few stitch sampler blocks for my in-progress patchwork afghan, I went for my first project. The first thing you’re supposed to knit is a scarf right? Well, I tried.  It wasn’t meant to be. Figuring it as an all-or-nothing sort of deal, I set my sights instead on the real goal of learning to knit — full-sized garments. Finding the simplest-yet-still-wearable sweater pattern possible, I cast on and tried my luck. The first week of sweater-making went well, right up until I reached the neckline and botched the entire thing by not understanding what “add second ball of yarn” meant. The entire project had to be frogged because my stitches were too tight to pick up after dropping and I learned a hard lesson in monitoring my stitch tension. Some time during all of that, I mail-ordered a cute little kit of KnitPro interchangeable circulars.

Starting over again, the sweater grew a lot faster since I knew what I was doing and my hands had developed enough muscle memory for me not to worry as much with my stitches. I learned to increase and decrease. I learned how to join yarn by felting so I wouldn’t leave a messy knot in my wool garments. I learned how to add a second ball of yarn so that my neck hole could actually fit a head through it. Ten days after my second start, with only a few further fumbles, I had an entire sweater. Sure, there were a few inconsistencies — I used a needle half a size larger than recommended because the store where I shopped didn’t carry the size I needed at the time. I compensated by making the sweater a size smaller. Turns out I could have gone two sizes smaller, but live and learn. I also misread the pattern a bit and ended up with a garter stitch side seam stripe rather than just an edging along the bottom vents. This ended up looking like a nice design detail, actually, and helped hide my less-than stellar handseaming. Chose to not add a garter stitch cuff to the wrists, since the arms were already quite long on their own and I rather liked the rolled edges. I ended up with something closer to a tunic — a few inches more and it could have been a mini-dress, really. Done up with a belt, big necklace and leggings, it actually fits right in with the stuff currently in stores. Go figure.

The real kicker? All the lecturing I got from teachers back in school was right, much as I hate to admit it. Blocking does wonders for smoothing out the details. This was how the sweater looked immediately after finishing. It was all fuzzy and smelled like five different hand lotions plus two cats. The stitches were kinda bumpy and the hems were flipping up in odd places. I’m usually far too impatient to block things neatly, so I tossed the thing in the washing machine on wool setting, figuring it would have to get a taste of what I was going to put it through normally. I put it onto the dressform to block dry and come back in the morning to find a light, comfortable sweater tunic with lovely smooth stitches! This might just be enough to convince me to hand-block my next sweater, if it comes in pieces. Woohoo!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

Right. So a few of you may know that I got my start in costuming with an oddly coincidental yet completely unrelated series of short films. Much of this was owed to my design school counselors trying to find me gigs that would suit my interest in period pieces, and the fact that many period pieces produced by film schools lately seem to focus on racial issues. Whatever the case was, my first few projects as a designer ended up consisting of — and I call them by these names fondly, because I did learn a ton from every single experience — the Slavery film, the KKK film, and the Nazi film.  At which point, many people looking through my portfolio were probably scratching their heads and wondering if I was one of those people with a secret psycho stash of sharp weaponry hidden behind the feather boas and tutus in my closet.

So it was with great pleasure that I was able to give an old costume a new lease on life very recently. A quick dye job done on location in school bathroom sinks, a night of artwork with the gold fabric paint pens, and the aid of three very special costumers later, Billy Joe Bob’s nightgown began its new life adorning the mother of God. As one person said, we’re either going straight to Hell or getting a pat on the back from the guys with the harps, depending on how you look at it.

Before and after:
IMG_0020IMG_0016

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

Added a few more pics from last month’s shoot because they turned out so adorable :-) The girls have a MySpace page and the album should be out in the next few months!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

Just updated the galleries to include my latest photo shoot. It had a Tokyo street style flavor and considering the short notice, we managed to make something fairly fun out of it!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

A gallery of my costume portfolio pictures from Februrary 2007 to February 2008.

Because I’ve been meaning to put together something like this for ages but was always confounded by the amount of coding involved until I discovered the fantastic gallery feature in WordPress. Yay for automation!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

Here’s a USC project from early 2008. The concentration camp pajamas were rentals, but Nazi boy was pretty much pieced together and homemade. Artistic license was taken with historical accuracy for the sake of giving a quickly recognizable visual imprint since it was such a short piece. It does have something of an allegorical feel to it as a result. Given the tiny amounts of time and budget they were working with, I think the result was great. Miss Keva was on set supervising that day, since I was in the middle of another project. This would also be the project where I let her borrow my car and kit, only to have it returned with the gas cap exchanged for a large pink rock. My friends are so weird.

_Ima_ at the Doorpost Film Project site

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
pierydys: (Default)

Originally published at Velvet Kerfuffle Fashion and Costumery. Please leave any comments there.

So you know that giant pile of clothes I haven’t worn for more than four years? Yeah, they’ve got something coming to them. The recent t-shirt makeovers just kinda got me to pull out all my equipment and muster up a bit of energy. Yesterday, I started sorting through stuff and matching them together for a few more projects. The result of one is depicted above. Mixed media dresses (pairing a stretchy knit with a woven) have been steadily gaining in popularity over the past year, so why not play with that? Before and after behind the cut.

Read the rest of this entry »

September 2017

S M T W T F S
     12
3456 789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios